Position & Company City, State Type Date Posted
Junior AssociateSteegeThomson Communications

Philadelphia, PA

Marketing & Communications

Oct 10
Featured Development CoordinatorFreire Schools

Philadelphia, PA

Development

Oct 10
Graduate Assistantships & ScholarshipsVillanova Theatre

Villanova, PA

Other

Oct 09
Featured Intake Counselor NETWORK OF VICTIM ASSISTANCE

JAMISON, PA

Human Services/Mental Health/Recovery

Oct 08
Development DirectorAfrican Education Program

Wayne, PA

Development

Oct 07
Featured Pennsylvania Crisis Response Team Project CoordinatorNETWORK OF VICTIM ASSISTANCE

JAMISON, PA

Human Services/Mental Health/Recovery

Oct 04
Regional ControllerAmerican Friends Service Committee

Philadelphia, PA

Finance/Operations

Sep 27
Nonprofit Bookkeeper / Accounting ClerkChrist Church in Philadelphia / Christ Church Preservation Trust

Philadelphia, PA

Finance/Operations

Sep 25
PresidentStudio Incamminati

Philadelphia , PA

Executive

Sep 20
Program OfficerPennsylvania Humanities Council

Philadelphia, PA

Program Management

Sep 18

From the blog

Making the Band-Aid Stick

Posted by Laura Otten, Ph.D., Director on 11 October 2019, 11:18 am

One of the enjoyable debates I have with students, and those who are philanthropically minded, is about addressing root causes vs. applying band-aids.  It often flows from a mention of Andrew Carnegie and his philosophy on giving and the responsibilities of the wealthy, much of which is laid out in his “The Gospel of Wealth.”  His thinking makes it easy to jump to the question of whether to fund organizations that work at eradicating the root causes of society’s problems or those that provide band-aids to treat the consequences of those problems. I would argue that there is no right.

Read the full post.
Dinkum Kreischer Miller Laura Solomon Subaru