Executive Administrative Assistant

Philadephia 19147, Pennsylvania

JoB Description

The Executive Administrative Assistant reports to the CEO and interfaces closely with key directors to assist in making consistent decisions and serving as liaison between them and the CEO. This new position will maintain professional calendars, meeting agendas and minutes, data and logistics, contact lists, expense tracking, travel arrangements, and will manage communication with key vendors, board members, and staff.

The Executive Assistant requires someone who is organized, self-motivated, trustworthy, and able to multi-task in a fast-paced environment. This position must maintain a high level of confidentiality at all times. We are looking for an enthusiastic, resourceful, and creative person willing to go the extra mile. We need an individual with strong communication and time management skills and someone that has the ability to handle travel and other logistical items. Best candidates have the ability to work under pressure, juggle tasks and work efficiently against deadlines. Must be a team player but self-motivated; a sense of tact and diplomacy is a must. An individual who knows how to remove roadblocks and can quickly sense what will help or hinder the achievement of our goals. Ability to interact with all levels of enterprise in a professional manner and the ability to interact with people on all levels of the enterprise in a professional manner while possessing strong problem-solving skills.

 

To Apply: Please send cover letter and resume to [email protected]

Contact: Patricia Dunne

From the blog

The Data Analytics Bandwagon

Posted by Laura Otten, Ph.D., Director on 13 October 2017, 6:16 pm

As more and more funders demand real data on how well promised goals are actually being met, how much social impact is actually being achieved, nonprofits better get over their fears and some portion of the public good, all our work is, therefore, good.  It isn’t; and we are doing our clients a huge disservice if we don’t take the time to understand what works, doesn’t work and how we might make what doesn’t work better and protect what does work, while even there working to make it even better. A recent study by IBM’s Corporate Citizenship and Corporate Affairs.

Read the full post.
Dinkum Elko and Associates Kreischer Miller Laura Solomon Subaru